Covid-19 vaccine doses going to waste in some of Spain’s regions due to unsuitable syringes

Meanwhile, regional governments have been left unprepared as to how to deal with politicians or retired health workers who are jumping the line to get the vaccination ahead of their turn

A vaccine dose is prepared in Valencia this week.
A vaccine dose is prepared in Valencia this week.Monica Torres

Spanish regions such as Andalusia, Catalonia and Madrid are wasting thousands of doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine by not injecting patients with the sixth dose contained in the vials. Since January 8, when the European Medicines Agency granted authorization, the five initial doses contained in the vials are now officially six, increasing the number of potential recipients.

But this change has not been exploited by a number of Spain’s territories, who are in charge of their own vaccination campaigns. Speaking on Thursday in the regional parliament, Andalusia’s health chief Jesús Aguirre admitted that this was the case. “You could take out up to five doses and there was a wee drop left, and that little bit is used to administer that sixth dose,” he said. “But we are talking about 20% more vaccinations.”

Catalonia has admitted it is only using the sixth dose from “two-thirds” of the vials, which would suggest wastage of around 10,000 doses

The Andalusian regional government has blamed the failure to use this dose on a “deficit of 0.1-millimeter syringes,” the type that is usually used to inject insulin or in pediatrics, and has promised to solve the issue. The extraction of the sixth dose is more difficult with the 0.2-millimeter syringes also being used to administer the vaccines.

Based on the information offered by Spain’s regions, it is impossible to calculate how much of the vaccine has been wasted. Catalonia, for its part, has admitted it is only using the sixth dose from “two-thirds” of the vials. The region has administered more than 165,000 doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine so far, which would suggest wastage of around 10,000 doses.

A similar situation is playing out in Madrid, which on Thursday announced the purchase of 280,000 syringes in order to take advantage of this sixth dose. This is a low amount, however, compared to the millions of suitable syringes that have been purchased by regions with a much smaller population, such as Murcia and the Balearic and Canary Islands. The Madrid region has stated that in “the majority of cases” it is managing to use the sixth dose, but it has offered little extra information.

Aragón, which purchased 1,870,000 syringes in September, says that it has managed to use “100% of the first five doses from each vial and 81% of the sixth, which is 97% of the total.” Castilla-La Mancha, meanwhile, puts the percentage at 90%, while Asturias, Castilla y León and the Basque Country opted not to provide figures when consulted by EL PAÍS. The rest of the regions, however, stated that the use of the sixth dose is widespread across their territories.

Sanctions for line-jumpers

A nurse vaccinating a resident of the Pare Vilaseca nursing home in Barcelona.
A nurse vaccinating a resident of the Pare Vilaseca nursing home in Barcelona.Albert Garcia (EL PAÍS)

Meanwhile, Spain’s regions are having to improvise a response to news that politicians, retired health workers and relatives of medical staff are jumping the line and receiving the Covid-19 vaccine ahead of their time. Currently, Spain is still in the first stage of the vaccination campaign, which is focussing on senior home residents, their carers, front-line medical workers and adults with serious disabilities.

The Health Ministry and the country’s regions have been working on the vaccination plan since September, but the scheme has failed to adequately set out how the order of the vaccinations should be supervised, and whether there should be some kind of sanction or punishment for those who jump the line or indeed what to do with unused doses.

The excuses offered so far by those who have got the vaccine early range from “wanting to boost confidence” in the vaccination, to claims of making use of “leftover doses.”

EL PAÍS has requested information from the country’s health departments as to the measures being taken against these irregularities. The majority have not responded. Extremadura, Madrid and Navarre claim that they are observing protocols, while Valencia, La Rioja, Andalusia and the Basque Country explain that they are cross-referencing databases: anyone who is found to have been given the vaccine despite not being on the list of phase one recipients must offer an explanation.

Health Minister Salvador Illa said this week that “proper planning” must be put in place to avoid wasting injections, adding that any sanctions for breaking protocol are the responsibility of the regions. For now, none of Spain’s regional governments have confirmed whether or not they have levied sanctions against offenders.

No second dose

Valencia premier Ximo Puig.
Valencia premier Ximo Puig.GVA (Europa Press)

One decision that has been made, however, is that Valencia is opting not to administer the second vaccine dose to anyone who has jumped the line. This includes, for example, the Socialist Party (PSOE) mayors of the municipalities of El Verger, Els Poblets and Rafelbuñol, who were found to have skipped the protocol and were given the vaccines in senior homes.

The PSOE premier of the region, Ximo Puig, has taken the decision not to administer the second dose to the 150 to 185 people thought to have jumped the line. They will instead be fully vaccinated when it is their turn, he insisted.

But Fernando Simón, the director of the Health Ministry’s Coordination Center for Health Alerts (CCAES) and the government’s most visible face during the coronavirus crisis, criticized the approach. “I understand that people who were vaccinated when they shouldn’t have been should admit their responsibility,” he said when asked by reporters about the incidents. “But from my point of view, I believe it would committing two errors: vaccinating people ahead of time and not administering the second vaccine.”

The issue is whether it is worse to waste the first dose by not giving the second one 21 to 42 days later, as stipulated by the manufacturer, or to fully immunize those who jumped the line. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine needs two doses for the recipient to develop 94% immunity to Covid-19, according to clinical trials. The regional government has said that it respects Simón’s opinion but that this was “a matter of institutional credibility.” The aforementioned mayors who jumped the line have been suspended from the party and their local councils will be deciding whether or not they should be fired.

Based on reporting by Oriol Güell, Eva Saiz, Pablo Linde, Jessica Mouzo and Ferran Bono.

English version by Simon Hunter.

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