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2026 World Cup: What you need to know about the stadiums in the US

Most of the stadiums will temporarily change names in order to follow FIFA’s policy on corporate sponsored names

The Metlife Stadium, where the 2026 World Cup Final will be played.
The Metlife Stadium, where the 2026 World Cup Final will be played.VIEW press (Getty Images)

The United States is preparing for the 2026 World Cup, the tournament it will host alongside Mexico and Canada. Atlanta, Boston, Dallas, Houston, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Miami, New Jersey, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Seattle will host matches for the tournament in 11 stadiums, some of which will make modifications or invest into renovations to improve the fans’ experience during the World Cup. Most of the venues will also change names temporarily to follow FIFA’s policy on corporate sponsored names, and will take the names of the cities where they are located. Here’s more about these venues.

MetLife Stadium

Scheduled to host the final game of the 2026 FIFA, the MetLife Stadium is situated in East Rutherford, New Jersey. Home to both the New York Giants and the New York Jets since its opening in 2010, it has a capacity of 82,500 and has been host to several sporting events like the Super Bowl XLVIII, Wrestlemania 29 and 35, and more. For the World Cup it will be renamed “New York New Jersey Stadium.”

AT&T Stadium

The AT&T Stadium before an NFL game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Dallas Cowboys.
The AT&T Stadium before an NFL game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Dallas Cowboys.Christian Petersen (Getty Images)

Located in Arlington, Dallas, AT&T Stadium is also referred to as “Jerry World” after Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones. With a seating capacity of 80,000, it’s the home turf for “America’s Team.” Opened in 2009, it has a retractable roof and the world’s largest column-free interior. The stadium is famous for its massive high-definition video screen, stretching from one 20-yard line to the other. Aside from NFL games, it has hosted numerous high-profile events including concerts, international soccer matches, and even professional bull riding competitions. It will be renamed “Cowboys Stadium” for the FIFA World Cup.

Arrowhead Stadium

The outside of the Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City.
The outside of the Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City.Icon Sportswire (Getty Images)

Nestled in Kansas City, Missouri, Arrowhead Stadium has been home to the Kansas City Chiefs since its opening in 1972. With a seating capacity of 76,416, Arrowhead is renowned for its record-breaking noise levels, earning it the moniker “The Loudest Stadium in the World.” In 2014, there was a register of 142.2 decibels from the Chiefs’ fans. The renovations for the World Cup will cost around $50 million.

NRG Stadium

Fans outside the NRG Stadium in Houston.
Fans outside the NRG Stadium in Houston.Carmen Mandato (Getty Images)

Situated in the heart of Houston, Texas, NRG Stadium has been home to the Houston Texans since 2002. It features a distinctive retractable roof and a natural grass playing surface. Boasting a seating capacity of 72,220, the stadium has hosted from Super Bowls to NCAA basketball tournaments, and is the home of the Texas Bowl. In accordance with FIFA’s policy on corporate sponsored names, it will be renamed to “Houston Stadium” during the World Cup.

Mercedes-Benz Stadium

Tailgating fans outside the Mercedes-Benz Stadium, in 2019.
Tailgating fans outside the Mercedes-Benz Stadium, in 2019.Kevin Liles (Getty Images)

Rising above the Atlanta skyline, Mercedes-Benz Stadium is home to the Atlanta Falcons and Atlanta United FC. It opened its doors in 2017. With a futuristic style, and a seating capacity of 71,000, it features a retractable roof that resembles a camera lens, symbolizing the city’s passion for both sports and creativity. Inside, it has a 360-degree video halo board that enhances game-day experience. Beyond sports, the Mercedes-Benz Stadium also hosts concerts, festivals, and international events. It will be renamed as “Atlanta Stadium” for the FIFA World Cup.

SoFi Stadium

The SoFi Stadium at Inglewood.
The SoFi Stadium at Inglewood.Icon Sportswire (Getty Images)

An important element of Inglewood, Los Angeles, SoFi Stadium emerges as a cutting-edge marvel in the realm of sports and entertainment. With a seating capacity of 70,240, it’s home to both the Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Chargers. It opened its doors in 2020, with several innovative features, including a translucent roof and the Oculus, a colossal circular video board suspended from the ceiling, setting new standards for stadium design and technology. It will host the Super Bowl LXI in 2027. The stadium will host the opening match for the United States on June 12, 2026, and seven other matches, including a quarterfinals match.

Lincoln Financial Field

The Lincoln Financial Field ahead of a friendly match between Germany and Mexico, last October.
The Lincoln Financial Field ahead of a friendly match between Germany and Mexico, last October.Omar Vega (Getty Images)

In the vibrant city of Philadelphia, Lincoln Financial Field has been home to the Philadelphia Eagles since 2003. This iconic stadium has witnessed the triumphs and trials of one of the NFL’s most storied franchises. With a seating capacity of 69,796, its construction included several LED video displays and more than 624 of LED ribbon boards to enhance the fans’ experience. It has been host to the NCAA lacrosse national championship five times, including in 2023. It will host six matches of the 2026 FIFA World Cup, changing its name to “Philadelphia Stadium.”

Lumen Field

An aerial view of Lumen Field in Seattle.
An aerial view of Lumen Field in Seattle.Kirby Lee (Getty Images)

Lumen Field — formerly known as CenturyLink Field — has been the home of the Seattle Seahawks since 2002 and the Seattle Sounders FC since 2009. Located in the iconic city of Seattle, Washington, it has a seating capacity of 68,740 and its construction includes the Washington Music Theater and a public plaza. Accessible from Downtown Seattle, the complex is also designed for soccer and has hosted the MLS Cup twice, the CONCACAF Champions League and other important soccer events. For the 2025 World Cup it will be named “Seattle Stadium” and the government will spend around $10 million to host the World Cup matches, including installation of a temporary grass surface, policing the venue and practice fields, and managing a fan festival.

Levi’s Stadium

Fans walk outside the Levi's Stadium, in November 2023.
Fans walk outside the Levi's Stadium, in November 2023.Josie Lepe (AP)

In the heart of Silicon Valley in Santa Clara, California, Levi’s Stadium is also one of the most innovative venues of this list. Home to the San Francisco 49ers since 2014, this state-of-the-art venue has a seating capacity of 68,500 and features cutting-edge technology and eco-friendly design elements, like solar panels and water-conserving landscaping. Levi’s Stadium set a new standard for environmentally conscious sports facilities. During the 2026 World Cup it will be temporarily renamed to “San Francisco Stadium.”

Gillette Stadium

The Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts.
The Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts.Maddie Meyer (Getty Images)

Situated in Foxborough, Massachusetts, just outside of Boston. Gillette Stadium has been home to the NFL’s New England Patriots since 2002 and the MLS’ New England Revolution since 2007. This iconic venue has sold out every home game of the Patriots since 1994, which makes it an icon for the city. With a seating capacity of 65,878, it has hosted several important international soccer matches for different tournaments. The stadium underwent a renovation project in 2022, ending in 2023, in perfect timing for next year’s World Cup, during which it will be renamed “Boston Stadium.”

Hard Rock Stadium

The F1 race track and the Hard Rock Stadium at Miami Gardens, Florida.
The F1 race track and the Hard Rock Stadium at Miami Gardens, Florida.Al Bello (Getty Images)

Located in the city of Miami Gardens, Florida, the Hard Rock Stadium has been home to the Miami Dolphins since 1987 and the Miami Hurricanes football team. This iconic venue has seen iconic events like six Super Bowls, two World Series, four BCS National Championship Games and much more. It has a seating capacity of 64,767, and it will be temporarily renamed to “Miami Stadium” during the 2026 World Cup.

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