Spanish general election 2015: As it happened

Popular Party is the most voted, leaving a highly fragmented Congress. Socialists maintain second place in terms of number of seats, but are closely followed by Podemos. Ciudadanos finishes fourth. Participation slightly up on 2011 polls

With the vote count up to over 99%, official figures show the incumbent Popular Party (PP) winning the election with 123 seats in Congress, a third fewer than the 186 it secured in 2011.

The Socialist Party (PSOE) comes in second with 90 representatives, making it the worst result in its history – even worse than in the previous election, when it sustained a crushing defeat at the hands of the PP.

According to these numbers, Podemos wins 42 deputies, but its other regional brands achieve a further 27 seats, for a total of 69.

Ciudadanos, the other big challenger in these elections, comes in fourth with 40 seats, while the United Left manages two.

As for regional parties, the Catalan Republican Left (ERC) is on course to obtain nine seats, while Democracia y Llibertat, the new brand led by Catalan premier Artur Mas, secures eight. The Basque Nationalist Party (PNV) gets six, while the radical Bildu obtains two. The Canaries Coalition will have one representative in Congress.

The results point to a completely fragmented Congress that will make forming a government particularly tricky.

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Nick Funnell
With 99.86% of votes counted: The PP has won the Spanish general election with 123 seats, the PSOE is second with 90, Podemos is third with 69 and Ciudadanos fourth with 40. The Catalan Republican Left obtains 9 deputies while Democràcia i Llibertat gets 8.
Nick Funnell
El País Editor-In-Chief Antonio Caño on the complex scenario that has emerged from this general election: "Spain will be governable, but the solution for the governance of Spain is not obvious."
Nick Funnell
Nick Funnell
Mariano Rajoy jumps up and down in celebration on the balcony of Popular Party headquarters in Madrid. His party has won the Spanish general election with 123 seats, 63 fewer than in 2011
Nick Funnell
Nick Funnell
Rajoy: "Whoever wins the election has to try to form a government and I am going to try to do so because Spain needs a stable government"
Nick Funnell
Nick Funnell
The leader of the winning Popular Party, Mariano Rajoy, is now speaking: "We have won the elections again. Solid bases have been laid down for the future, with more than 1.6 million votes and 30 seats’ difference over the second-biggest force."
Nick Funnell
Nick Funnell
"It all starts today," concludes Ciudadanos’ Albert Rivera, whose party has won 40 seats
Nick Funnell
Nick Funnell
Ciudadanos’ Rivera: "40 men and women [his deputies] are going to think about Spain. Only us, with just one project and not at any price, are going to be decisive in forming majorities that govern in this country."
Nick Funnell
Nick Funnell
Ciudadanos leader Albert Rivera also speaks of a "new political era" starting in Spain as he addresses supporters. "Millions of Spaniards have decided that Spain is going to change. We are going to take part in political change."
Nick Funnell
Nick Funnell
PSOE chief Sánchez concedes victory to the Popular Party but says the election result has opened "a new political phase in Spain that leaves behind imposition and opens a process of dialogue and agreement."
Nick Funnell
Nick Funnell
Socialist leader Pedro Sánchez has thanked the more than five million Spaniards who voted for his party against "the attempt to make the PSOE disappear."
Nick Funnell
Nick Funnell
"We are the fifth-biggest force in terms of number of votes, even though we have been punished by the electoral system" - United Left leader Alberto Garzón, whose party has won two seats
Nick Funnell
Nick Funnell
Latest: The Popular Party has won the Spanish general election but is far from the majority it needs to form a government
Nick Funnell
Simon Hunter
Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias: "Spain has put an end to the revolving door political system and is beginning a new era. We are the first political force in terms of votes in Catalonia and in the Basque Country, and the second in Madrid and Valencia"
Simon Hunter
Simon Hunter
Podemos candidate Rita Mosaho celebrates the election results. You can read about the woman who will be Spain"s first black Congress member here http://cort.as/aG-4 Photo: Pepe Olivaresjavascript:void(0);
Simon Hunter
Simon Hunter
Pablo Iglesias first leader to come out and address the media. "Spain has voted for a change of system."
Simon Hunter
Simon Hunter
EL PAÍS bosses in the conference room, debating tomorrow"s print edition
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Nick Funnell
The scene outside Popular Party headquarters in Madrid. Photo: Samuel Sánchez
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Simon Hunter
"Deputy PM Sáenz de Santa María: "The PP has won these general elections." That"s true but from here on, complete uncertainty’ writes EL PAÍS journalist Carlos Yárnoz on Twitter
Simon Hunter
Nick Funnell
Ciudadanos leaders confirm they will not vote in favor of electing either the Popular Party"s Mariano Rajoy or Socialist chief Pedro Sánchez as prime minister
Nick Funnell
Simon Hunter
EL PAÍS webpage hits a million visits tonight! Photo by Cristóbal Manuel
Simon Hunter
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