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VW SCANDAL

50,000 Spanish cars affected by second Volkswagen scandal

Carmaker stands to lose government subsidies for low CO2 emissions following disclosure

The Volkswagen Golf could be affected by the second emissions scandal.
The Volkswagen Golf could be affected by the second emissions scandal.ERIC PIERMONT (AFP)

Volkswagen on Wednesday told Spanish Industry Minister José Manuel Soria that there are 50,000 cars in Spain affected by a second emissions scandal that was revealed on Tuesday.

Besides the original fraud involving software that deliberately reduced nitrogen oxide emissions during engine testing in order to pass environmental controls, the German carmaker has now admitted that carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions were also understated, and that some vehicles’ real fuel consumption could be higher than customers were led to believe.

García Sanz underscored that the multinational remains committed to Spain, suggesting that the group will press ahead with its €4.2 billion investment plans

According to global chief of purchases Francisco Javier García Sanz, 50,000 of the 800,000 vehicles affected worldwide by this second case are circulating on Spanish roads. This time, cars that run on gasoline are also affected, whereas the September scandal involved diesel engines only.

This new information could force the automaker to return state subsidies known as Plan PIVE, aimed at buyers of the brands Volkswagen, Audi, Seat and Skoda. Only vehicles that can certify emissions lower than 120 grams of CO2 per kilometer may benefit from the aid.

Industry Minister Soria said the government will work to “resolve this issue in the best interest of consumers,” but did not offer any specific measures. He described this second scandal as “unacceptable.”

More information
Volkswagen promises to assume emissions scandal costs in Spain
Seat may have installed over 500,000 altered diesel engines into its cars
Spain’s public prosecutor calls for VW to be investigated for fraud

Volkswagen has expressed a willingness to cover all costs involved by the new revelations, and if necessary to return the funds awarded by the Spanish government to vehicles with low CO2 emissions, which have a direct impact on climate change.

García Sanz underscored that the multinational remains committed to Spain, suggesting that the group will press ahead with its €4.2 billion investment plans for the VW plants in Navarre and Catalonia.

The company has yet to officially identify the models affected by the new CO2 scandal, but a source quoted by Bloomberg mentioned the Volkswagen Polo, Golf and Passat, the Audi A1 and A3, the Skoda Octavia and the Seat Ibiza and León.

English version by Susana Urra.

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