EDITORIALEditorials
i

Clinton makes history

Former US state secretary will be the first female candidate to the White House

Hillary Clinton addressing a crowd in New Jersey.
Hillary Clinton addressing a crowd in New Jersey.Steve Sands / WireImage

By securing the necessary number of delegates at the Democratic primaries, Hillary Clinton has clinched the nomination to the US presidency. Although her victory is without a doubt a historic achievement that breaks a glass ceiling for women, it would be tremendously unfair to disregard the equally important and truly brilliant résumé of the Democratic nominee.

She is a successful lawyer who, following a necessary break to avoid a conflict of interest with her partner – which did not prevent her from pushing forward major health and education reforms – launched a career in politics, first as senator for New York, then as pre-candidate to the US presidency and as head of US diplomacy.

Clinton is right about not underrating the options of billionaire property magnate Donald Trump

It is also historical that, for the first time, a woman is not being placed on the ticket specifically to attract a certain vote, as was the case in past elections with the nomination of women as running mates; Clinton represents a project unto itself, and she has earned the nomination after a tough match against an unyielding candidate who is refusing to bow out of the race until the last minute, and who enjoys great support from left-wing voters: Bernie Sanders.

As fate – and the votes of Republican sympathizers – would have it, her rival in the November elections is the antithesis of the values and vision of the US and the world that Clinton represents. Misogyny, lack of solidarity, isolationism and arrogance in foreign politics are the principles that Donald Trump not so much defends as boasts about.

But Clinton is right about not underrating the billionaire’s options. The dozen or more republican rivals who were left by the wayside are proof that it is a big mistake not to take Trump seriously. Clinton may have won the Democratic nomination, but the most important battle still lies ahead: the White House.

English version by Susana Urra.

Sign up for our newsletter

EL PAÍS English Edition has launched a weekly newsletter. Sign up today to receive a selection of our best stories in your inbox every Saturday morning. For full details about how to subscribe, click here.

More information

You may also like

Most viewed in...

Top 50